Color perception in the Aesthetics of Kant and Hume

– the original paper (Dutch version, see below) was given a 7.8/10 by Rob van Gerwen

            Colors, Barry Maund states in his article ‘Color’ in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosohpy, “are of philosophical interest for two kinds of reasons. One is that colors comprise such a large and important portion of our social, personal and epistemological lives and so a philosophical account of our concepts of color is highly desirable. The second reason is that trying to fit colors into accounts of metaphysics, epistemology and science leads to philosophical problems that are intriguing and hard to resolve. Not surprisingly, these two kinds of reasons are related. The fact that colors are so significant in their own right, makes more pressing the philosophical problems of fitting them into more general metaphysical and epistemological frameworks.”[1] I would like to add to the list of theories in which it is hard to apply a theory of color that of aesthetics. Not only are colors especially relevant for the object of aesthetics: the beautiful, but several important aesthetic theories were developed in a time when multiple definitions of color were also rapidly developing: Goethe published his book on colors Zur Farbenlehre in 1810, and later in the 19th century, physicists like Maxwell and Helmholtz confirmed the theory of Isaac Newton from the early 18th century. In this paper, I want to compare two aesthetic theories, with a focus on the notions of color of their authors. These are Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804) and his great predecessor in aesthetics, David Hume (1711 – 1776). I will start with Kant’s distinction between the material and the formal, and will show how he (successfully) deals with a number of problems concerning color. From here, I will jump to the contemporary physical/physiological description of the process of color perception, and show that Kant’s notion of color in combination with his aesthetics, considering the contemporary definition of color, stands stronger than Hume’s, which I will also shortly explain.
In short, Kant’s analysis of the judgment of taste revolves around two things. Everyone has his/her own opinions about works of art, and people have a hard time convincing each other of the beauty of a thing. Still, there is something in judgments of taste that makes us suspect that our judgment is about more than just an opinion, there is a certain universality to it (the antinomy of taste).[2] [3] In short, the explanation lies, according to Kant, in the fact that our judgments of taste are founded on a concept, but that this concept is vague, indefinite. So we suspect that we have a grounded opinion, but we can hardly convince others that they have chosen the wrong view on a certain object of art. If we ourselves want to make a pure judgment of taste, Kant says, we have to found it on subjective purposiveness, and very importantly, make it without interest, unhindered by charm/excitement and emotion (Reiz und Rührung). Only then the judgment is pure. What  “genius” is, what true art is, what the experience of beauty and how this fits within Kant’s epistemology I will not discuss here, because for the rest of this paper, it is (highly) suggested as base knowledge, but it is not needed for my conclusion.

            Traditionally, the formal aspects of our states of mind are associated with what is communicable, not the material aspects. Therefore the grounds of a judgment of taste would in some way be formal and not material. Charm/excitement (arousement may also be a fitting translation) is more of a direct effect of the objects on us, and it requires little to no reflection from us. The communicability is of great importance, at least for Kant, and for him it is a reason to say that charm is of such a different category that it cannot play a part in stating the pure judgment of taste. It always disturbs impartiality.[4]
To clarify this problem, it is useful to repeat the distinction between primary and secondary qualities.[5] “The primary qualities of an object are properties which the object possesses independent of us — such as occupying space, being either in motion or at rest, having solidity and texture. The secondary qualities are powers in bodies to produce ideas in us like color, taste, smell and so on that are caused by the interaction of our particular perceptual apparatus with the primary qualities of the object.”[6] We may say that secondary qualities are rather less formal and communicable, and that primary qualities thus are of more relevance for our judgments of taste (for Kant, something non-communicable cannot help form a pure judgment of taste at all). [7]
Now, in the contemporary qualia debate, but also in Kant’s time there are/were theories that state(d) that secondary qualities are reducible to spatio-temporal structures: primary qualities. This debate is far from over, and the distinction between primary and secondary qualities is probably in no way as simple as the definition stated above may cause to suspect. On top of that, we are far from sure whether primary and secondary qualities are coextensive with the formal and material aspects of a work of art, so when, in forming a judgment of taste, we abstract from charm and emotion, we are still not sure whether we have abstracted from all secondary qualities.[8]

            Kant is aware that secondary qualities are possibly reducible to primary ones. This does not at all mean that this would be a weak point in his theory. If colors and tones turn out to belong to the formal aspects, says Kant, this might, consistent with his theory, simply lead to a pure judgment of taste. What we used to regard as colors and tones simply turn out to belong to the formal structure (we can form pure judgments of taste about them now), and our feelings of excitement and emotion turn out simply to be delight in the beautiful.

“If one assumes, with Euler([9], JJK), that the colors are vibrations (pulsus) of the air immediately following one another, just as tones are vibrations of the air disturbed by sound, and, what is most important, that the mind does not merely perceive, by sense, their effect on the animation of the organ, but also, by reflection, perceives the regular play of the impressions (hence the form in the combination of different representations) (about which I have very little doubt),  then colors and tones would not be mere sensations. They would be nothing short of formal determinations of the unity of a manifold of sensations, but would already be a formal determination of the unity of a manifold of them, and in that case could also be counted as beauties in themselves. [10]

From this follows that, when all secundary qualities are reducible to primary ones, we can, for example, see the colors in a painting as intrinsically beautiful. But can we then, in the description of a painting, make a distinction between colors and shapes, and if not, isn’t this problematic? And is there something more to a painting than the colors, which in fact are reducible to shapes? With the separation of formal and material aspects we could see a painting as a whole that causes two kinds of states of mind in us: formal and material. Now we treat color as causing a formal state of mind in us, en we can only see the painting as form that is color, or color that is shape. Isn’t there something that distinguishes color from form here, even with this new notion of color?

            In discussing these problems, I will not talk about tones, because for the relevant part, perception of color and sound for humans are similar.  The question we have to ask is: given a certain definition of color perception (Euler’s, for example), how does Kant’s theory deal with it?
To clarify the situation, I will first shortly describe modern color theory. When electromagnetic radiation has a wavelenght within the range of what humans can perceive, it is called ‘light’. The spectrum of light is determined by the intensity of different wavelenghts. The full spectrum of light that falls on an object determines how the object appears to us. A surface that absorbs all wavelengths fully is called ‘black,’ while a surface that reflects all wavelengths fully is called ‘white.’ Light itself has no color! Distinguishing colors is possible through three different types of cells in the retina, called ‘cones.’ Our visual acuteness is greatest in the so called yellow spot, diametrical opposite the lens. [11] [12](see figure)

Colour perception graphic

Spectral sensitivity of the three different types of cones in the retina. Data from “the Stockman & Sharpe (2000) 10° quantal cone fundamentals”; graphic by Koen B. (OpenOffice.org Calc). Source: Wikimedia Comons, license free

Color blindness can help us understand how much colors are inside of us. With color blindness, one or more types of cones do not work properly. As a result, less colors are perceived. Kant wasn’t aware of details like this, but from his perspective, it is maintainable that reflected light becomes color only when it is perceived by us, until when it is nothing more than a collection of wavelengths (like modern physicists maintain[13]). The quotation above (If one assumes, with Euler, that the colors are vibrations (pulsus) of the air immediately following one another, (…)) implies that vibrations in the air are the colors. The stated contemporary definition does not state this. It states that wavelengths that reached the eye that were perceived are colors, and that without present humans capable of visual perception, there would be no color.[14] Modern color theory does reduce colors to spatio-temporal structures, but involves human activity (perception). Thus color can be completely explained in material terms, but does not become a primary quality according to Locke’s definition because it is still dependent of us. With this definition we can still make the distinction between color and shape, because color requires activity from us, humans. There thus is no need to apply the alternative that Kant discussed with reference to Euler, and Kant’s theory corresponds with the above explained color theory perfectly.

            Someone who does get into trouble with the explained theory is Kant’s great predecessor in (among others) aesthetics: David Hume. Hume was an empiricist, and his aesthetics is greatly empirically designed. That is not of the greatest importance here, though. What matters is that Hume was, concerning colors, a subjectivist. Objectivism, concerning colors, opposes that and states that names for colors refer to qualities in reality. Hume, on the other hand, believed that we project colors on reality, and that names for colors do not refer to objects in that reality. It follows from his skeptical position that he was extra careful with deriving “truths” from the empirical. Colors are objects of our perception, but there is nothing we can deduce from that they are properties of the objects.
Hume’s empirical aesthetics concern, in short, emotions caused by objective properties, properties we can discuss, while our emotions remain subjective. A judgment of taste expresses an emotion, a sentiment of beauty. An object has certain objective qualities that, through perception in the spectator, cause a certain emotion, that makes him/her attribute a certain quality to the object. A judgment of taste depends on the concepts with which the object is named and on the kind of beauty that is perceived in it.[15] After experiencing the sentiment of beauty, what we call the search for intelligibility takes place, and finally we want to communicate our judgments.

            However, just like the way Hume’s notion of colors and the contemporary theory stated simply contradict, Hume’s aesthetics, with which we are concerned here, is hardly thinkable with a theory that in such a way assumes an origin of color perception in “reality.” One of Hume’s most widely known objections on empirical science was that causality, he said, in itself is not derivable. When frequently perceiving the same series of events, we gain some sort of habit. This happens strictly in our minds. We derive nothing from external reality.[16] Without causality’s certainty, we don’t have the certainty of the truth of the theory described. Hume’s aesthetics can’t be imagined with a description of color that fully contradicts his epistemology. When we assume one thing as true, we undermine the other thing, and vice versa.
What becomes clear is at least that the theories of Hume and Kant, as far as this goes, are of different kinds. Kant gives an aesthetic theory that distinguishes formal and material aspects. Although this might not seem plausible in all contexts, Kant is prepared for a changing definition of color (and sound) perception. Hume, on the contrary, makes assertions on color perception that is safe as long as we accept his remarks on deriving knowledge from reality. However, we can’t just grab a new definition of color that assumes we can derive knowledge from reality, and insert it in his theory.
Hume’s skepticism, and his refusing to acknowledge that colors (partly) have their origin in reality is a well defendable position, but incompatible with the modern scientific that says that colors are our perceptions of reflected light. As far as concerns the strictly argumentative maintainability, we better knock at Hume’s door. But when we are looking for a theory (from that period, at least) that is able to deal with physical/physiological development of the following decennia, (which are not to be disregarded, to say the least) Kant seems to be the better option.


[1] Barry Maund, “Color,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2008 Edition), ed. Edward N. Zalta, URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/color/&gt; (2 oktober 2011)

[2] Rob van Gerwen, Kennis in Schoonheid – Een inleiding in de moderne esthetica (Amsterdam: Boom Meppel, 1992), 67 – 68.

[3] For a detailed treatment of this problem see Wenzel, Kant’s Aesthetics, 121 – 122.

[4] Christian Helmut Wenzel, An Introduction to Kant’s Aesthetics – Core Concepts and Problems (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), 60 – 61.

[5] Robert Boyle introduced the terms “primary qualities” and “secondary qualities.” In philosophy, the terminology is most often associated with John Locke.

[6] William Uzgalis, “John Locke”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition), ed. Edward N. Zalta, URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2010/entries/locke/&gt; (1 oktober 2011).

[7] Wenzel, Kant’s Aesthetics, 63.

[8] Wenzel, Kant’s Aesthetics, 63 – 64.

[9] Leonhard Euler (1707 – 1783) was a Swiss physicist and mathematician.

[10] Immanuel Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment, 6th ed., transl. Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 109.

[11] R. W. G. Hunt & M. R. Pointer, Measuring Color, 4th ed. (Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011). 1 – 15.

[12] Bruce MacEvoy, “Light and the eye,” URL = <http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/color1.html#constraints&gt; (2 oktober 2011).

[13] Hunt & Pointer, 1.

[14] Hunt & Pointer, 1.

[15] Van Gerwen, Kennis in Schoonheid, 44 – 45.

[16] David Hume, “An Enquiry concerning human understanding,” URL = < http://18th.eserver.org/hume-enquiry.html > (3 oktober 2011).

Bibliography

 Gerwen, van, Rob. Kennis in Schoonheid – Een inleiding in de moderne esthetica. Amsterdam: Boom Meppel, 1992.

Hume, David. “An enquiry concerning human understanding.” URL = <http://18th.eserver.org/hume-enquiry.html&gt; (last visited 3 oktober 2011).

Hume, David. “Of the standard of taste.”  URL = <http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/IBES/files/taste_hume.pdf&gt; (geraadpleegd 30 september 2011).

Hunt, R. W. G.  & Pointer, M. R. Measuring Color, 4th  ed. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. 1st ed. 1987.

Kant, Immanuel. Critique of the Power of Judgment, 6th  ed. Transl. by Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. 109. 1st  ed. 2000.

Maund, Barry. “Color.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2008 Edition), ed. Edward N. Zalta. URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/color/&gt; (geraadpleegd 2 oktober 2011)

Uzgalis, William. “John Locke.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition), ed. Edward N. Zalta. URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2010/entries/locke/&gt; (geraadpleegd 1 oktober 2011).

Wenzel, Christian Helmut. An Introduction to Kant’s Aesthetics – Core Concepts and Problems. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005.

Dutch version:

Kleuren, zo leidt Barry Maund zijn artikel ‘Color’ in de Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosohpy in, zijn filosofisch interessant om twee soorten redenen. De een is dat kleuren een groot en belangrijk deel beslaan van onze sociale, persoonlijke en epistemologische levens, daarom is een theorie van onze concepten van kleuren zeer wenselijk. De ander is dat het proberen in te passen van kleuren in metafysische, epistemologische en wetenschappelijke theorieën leidt tot serieuze filosofische problemen die intrigerend en moeilijk op te lossen zijn.[1] Ik zou aan het rijtje soorten theorieën waarin het moeilijk is een theorie van kleuren toe te passen graag de esthetische toevoegen. Niet alleen zijn kleuren natuurlijk zeer relevant voor het object van de esthetica: het schone, maar meerdere zeer belangrijke esthetische theorieën werden ontwikkeld in een tijd waarin meerdere definities van kleur rondzwierven en ook volop in ontwikkeling waren: Goethe bracht in 1810 zijn boek over kleuren Zur Farbenlehre uit, en later in de 19e eeuw deden natuurkundigen als Maxwell en Helmholtz werk dat de eerdere theorie van Isaac Newton uit het begin van de 18e eeuw bevestigde.

In deze paper wil ik twee esthetische theorieën vergelijken, met behulp van de kleurbegrippen van de betreffende auteurs. Deze auteurs zijn Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804) en diens grote voorganger op het gebied van de esthetica, David Hume (1711-1776). Ik zal beginnen met Kant’s onderscheid tussen het materiële en het formele, en laat zien hoe hij (succesvol) met een aantal problemen betreffende kleur omgaat. Vanuit dit verhaal maak ik een sprong naar de huidige natuurkundige/fysiologische beschrijving van het proces van de kleurervaring, en laat ik zien dat deze netjes in Kant’s theorie inpast. Vervolgens behandel ik Hume’s positie in de esthetica en welke rol hij kleur daarin geeft, om tot de conclusie te komen dat Kant’s begrip van kleur in combinatie met zijn esthetica in het licht van onze hedendaagse definitie van kleur sterker staat dan dat van Hume.

In het kort draait Kant’s analyse van het smaakoordeel om twee dingen. Ieder heeft over kunstwerken zijn eigen mening, en mensen kunnen elkaar maar moeilijk overtuigen. Toch is er iets in smaakoordelen wat ons doet vermoeden dat ons oordeel meer dan slechts een mening betreft, er kleeft een zekere universaliteitaanspraak aan (de antinomie van de smaak).[2] De verklaring daarvoor ligt volgens Kant bij het feit dat onze smaakoordelen gefundeerd zijn op een begrip, maar dat dit begrip onbepaald is. Hierdoor vermoeden we wel dat we een gefundeerde mening hebben, maar kunnen we anderen toch moeilijk overtuigen dat zij het verkeerde standpunt hebben gekozen ten opzichte van een bepaald kunstobject. Als wij zelf een zuiver smaakoordeel willen vellen, zegt Kant, moeten we dat funderen op subjectieve doelmatigheid, en het verder volstrekt belangeloos doen, en ongehinderd door opwinding en ontroering. Alleen dan is het oordeel puur. Wat genialiteit is, wat ware kunst is, wat de ervaring van schoonheid inhoud en hoe dit past binnen Kant’s kenleer bespreek ik hier niet, omdat het voor de rest van mijn paper slechts als achtergrondkennis vereist is en niet concreet aan bod komt.

Traditioneel gezien worden de formele aspecten van onze geestestoestanden (states of mind) en niet de materiële geassocieerd met wat communiceerbaar is. Daarom zouden de funderingsgronden van een smaakoordeel op eniger manier formeel zijn en niet materieel. Opwinding is meer een direct effect van de objecten op ons, en vereist weinig tot geen reflectie van onze kant. De communiceerbaarheid is van groot belang, althans voor Kant, en voor deze is dit dan ook een reden om te zeggen dat opwinding van een zo andere categorie is dat het geen rol kan spelen in het pure smaakoordeel. Opwinding zit altijd de onpartijdigheid in de weg.[3]

Om het probleem te verduidelijken is het handig het onderscheid tussen primaire en secundaire kwaliteiten te herhalen.[4] Primaire kwaliteiten zijn de kwaliteiten van een object (structuur, massa) die onafhankelijk zijn van ons, secundaire kwaliteiten de krachten in objecten om ideeën in ons te produceren als smaak, kleur, reuk en dergelijke.[5] Bij Kant kunnen we dan zeggen dat secundaire kwaliteiten minder formeel en communiceerbaar zijn, en dat daarom de primaire kwaliteiten eerder relevant zijn voor smaakoordelen (iets wat niet communiceerbaar is kan volgens Kant überhaupt geen rol spelen in het smaakoordeel).[6]

Nu, in het huidige qualia-debat, maar ook al in Kant’s tijd, zijn/waren echter theorieën te vinden die stellen dat secundaire kwaliteiten te reduceren zijn tot spatio-temporele structuren: primaire kwaliteiten. Dit debat is nog lang niet besloten, en het onderscheid tussen primaire en secundaire kwaliteiten is dan ook lang zo besloten niet als de zojuist gegeven simpele definitie doet vermoeden. Bovendien, we zijn ook lang niet zeker of primaire en secundaire kwaliteiten samenvallen met respectievelijk de formele en materiële aspecten van een kunstwerk, dus als we in het vormen van een oordeel abstraheren van opwinding en ontroering, zijn we nog steeds niet zeker of we geabstraheerd hebben van alle secundaire kwaliteiten.[7]

Kant is zich er bewust van dat secundaire kwaliteiten mogelijk reduceerbaar zijn tot primaire. Dit betekent nog niet dat dit een zwak punt is in zijn theorie. Als kleuren en tonen eigenlijk tot de formele aspecten behoren, stelt Kant, kan dat, consistent met zijn theorie, gewoon leiden tot een zuiver smaakoordeel. Wat we voorheen als kleuren en tonen beschouwden, blijken nu enkel tot de formele structuur te behoren (we kunnen er nu wel zuivere smaakoordelen over vormen), en onze gevoelens van opwinding en ontroering blijken slechts genoegen in het schone te zijn.

“If one assumes, with Euler([8], JJK), that the colors are vibrations (pulsus) of the air immediately following one another, just as tones are vibrations of the air disturbed by sound, and, what is most important, that the mind does not merely perceive, by sense, their effect on the animation of the organ, but also, by reflection, perceives the regular play of the impressions (hence the form in the combination of different representations) (about which I have very little doubt),  then colors and tones would not be mere sensations. They would be nothing short of formal determinations of the unity of a manifold of sensations, but would already be a formal determination of the unity of a manifold of them, and in that case could also be counted as beauties in themselves. [9]

Hieruit volgt dat, wanneer alle secundaire kwaliteiten tot primaire te reduceren zijn, we in bijvoorbeeld een schilderij de kleuren wel kunnen zien als intrinsieke schoonheden. Maar kunnen we dan in de beschrijving van een schilderij nog wel onderscheid maken tussen de kleuren en de vorm, en zo nee, is dit niet problematisch? En is er dan nog wel iets anders aan een schilderij dan kleur, die dus eigenlijk vorm is? Met de scheiding van formele en materiële aspecten konden we een schilderij zien als een geheel dat twee soorten geestestoestanden in ons voortbrengt: formeel en materieel. Nu behandelen we de kleur als formele geestestoestanden in ons voortbrengend, en kunnen we het schilderij enkel nog zien als vorm die kleur is, of juist als kleur die vorm is. Blijft er niet iets wat kleur op dit gebied onderscheidt van vorm, ook met deze nieuwe kijk op kleur?

In het uitwerken van deze problemen beperk ik mij tot kleuren en laat ik tonen buiten beschouwing, omwille van de hoeveelheid beschikbare ruimte en omdat voor zover nodig de waarneming van kleur en geluid bij de mens vergelijkbaar is. De vraag die we ons moeten stellen is: gegeven een bepaalde definitie van kleurervaring (bijvoorbeeld die van Euler), hoe gaat Kant’s theorie hiermee om? Kant’s uitleg van wat het zou betekenen als secundaire eigenschappen tot primaire reduceerbaar zouden zijn, is van een als-dan-soort, en is dus meer een soort troef die Kant achter de hand hield voor het geval een opvatting als die van Euler de juiste zou blijken te zijn.

Om de situatie beter uit te leggen, geef ik eerst een korte beschrijving van moderne kleurtheorie. Wanneer elektromagnetische straling een golflengte binnen de voor mensen waarneembare grens heeft, wordt deze ‘licht’ genoemd. Het spectrum van het licht wordt bepaald door de intensiteit van de verschillende golflengten. Het volledige spectrum van het binnenkomende licht bij een object bepaalt hoe het object aan ons verschijnt. Een oppervlak dat alle golflengten volledig absorbeert, wordt zwart genoemd. Een voorwerp dat alle golflengten volledig weerkaatst, wordt wit genoemd. Licht heeft zelf geen kleur! Het onderscheiden van kleuren is mogelijk dankzij drie verschillende typen lichtgevoelige cellen in het netvlies (Cones in het Engels, kegeltjes in het Nederlands). Onze gezichtsscherpte is het grootst in de zogeheten gele vlek, diametraal tegenover het midden van de lens van het oog.[10] [11] (zie figuur)

Kleurenblindheid kan ons helpen begrijpen in hoeverre kleuren zich buiten dan wel binnen ons bevinden. Bij kleurenblindheid functioneren één of meer typen kegeltjes niet goed, waardoor minder kleuren worden waargenomen. Kant was zich in zijn tijd nog niet bewust van het fijne van de kleurervaring, maar vanuit zijn perspectief is houdbaar dat weerkaatst licht pas kleur wordt zodra het door ons wordt waargenomen, en het tot die tijd slechts een verzameling golflengtes is (gelijk aan de positie van de hedendaagse natuurkunde[12]). Het hierboven gegeven citaat (If one assumes, with Euler, that the colors are vibrations (pulsus) of the air immediately following one another, (…)) impliceert namelijk dat de trillingen in de lucht de kleuren zijn. De hierboven gegeven moderne kleurtheorie stelt dit niet. Deze stelt dat waargenomen ontvangen golflengtes kleuren zijn, en dat zonder aanwezigen in staat tot visuele waarneming er geen kleur zou zijn.[13] Moderne kleurtheorie reduceert kleuren wél tot spatio-temporele structuren, maar betrekt hier wel menselijke activiteit (waarneming) bij. Kleur is dus wel volledig materialistisch uit te leggen, maar wordt volgens Locke’s definitie géén primaire kwaliteit omdat het nog steeds afhankelijk is van ons. Met deze definitie kunnen we nog steeds het onderscheid maken tussen kleur en vorm, omdat kleur toch enige activiteit van ons, de mens, vereist. Het alternatief dat Kant met referentie aan Euler bespreekt is dus helemaal niet van toepassing, en Kants theorie valt zonder problemen samen met boven uitgelegde kleurtheorie.

Iemand die eerder in de problemen komt met de zojuist beschreven theorie is Kant’s grote voorganger op het gebied van (onder meer) de esthetica: David Hume. Hume was een empirist, en ook zijn esthetica is sterk empiristisch beïnvloed. Dat is hier echter niet van het grootste belang. Hume was namelijk, wat kleuren betreft, een subjectivist. Het objectivisme, op dit gebied, staat daar tegenover en houdt de theorie in die zegt dat namen voor kleuren verwijzen naar kwaliteiten in de werkelijkheid. Hume daarentegen geloofde dat wij kleuren projecteren op de werkelijkheid, en dat namen voor kleuren dan ook niet verwijzen naar objecten in die werkelijkheid. Het volgt uit zijn sceptische houding dat hij uiterst voorzichtig is met het afleiden van “waarheden” uit het empirische. Kleuren zijn zeker objecten van onze waarneming, maar we kunnen nergens uit afleiden dat ze ook echt eigenschappen van de objecten zijn.

Hume’s empiristische esthetica gaat, kort gezegd, over emoties veroorzaakt door objectieve eigenschappen, eigenschappen waar we vervolgens over kunnen twisten, terwijl onze emoties subjectief blijven. Een smaakoordeel drukt een schoonheidsemotie uit. Een object heeft bepaalde objectieve kwaliteiten die via de gewaarwording in de toeschouwer een bepaalde emotie veroorzaken, op grond waarvan deze aan het object een bepaalde kwaliteit toeschrijft. Een smaakoordeel hangt af van de concepten waarmee het object benoemd wordt en van de soort schoonheid die erin wordt waargenomen.[14] Na het ervaren van de schoonheidsemotie vindt mogelijk plaats wat we de zoektocht naar intelligibiliteit (begrijpelijkheid) noemen, en uiteindelijk willen we over onze oordelen communiceren.

Echter, net zo als dat Hume’s kijk op kleuren en bovenstaande theorie simpelweg niet samen gaan, is Hume’s esthetica, waar we het hier over hebben, bijna niet te denken met een theorie die zodanig uitgaat van een oorsprong van kleurervaring in de fysieke werkelijkheid. Een van Hume’s bekenste bezwaren tegen de empirische wetenschap was juist dat causaliteit, zei hij, op zichzelf niet af te leiden valt. Wat we doen bij het meermaals waarnemen van dezelfde opeenvolging van gebeurtenissen, is het vormen van een soort gewoonte. Dit gebeurt dus strikt in onze geest. We leiden niets af uit de werkelijkheid. [15] Wanneer we dus de zekerheid van causaliteit niet hebben, hebben we eveneens de zekerheid van de waarheid van de hierboven beschreven kleurtheorie niet. Hume’s esthetica is amper in te denken met een beschrijving van kleur die volledig tegen zijn epistemologie ingaat. Wanneer we het ene als waar aannemen, ondermijnen we het andere, en andersom.

Wat duidelijk wordt is in ieder geval dat de theorieën van Hume en Kant wat dit betreft van een hele andere orde zijn. Kant geeft een esthetische theorie die formele en materiële soorten geestestoestanden onderscheidt. Hoewel dit niet in alle contexten even plausibel zal overkomen, is Kant wel voorbereid op een mogelijk veranderende definitie van kleurervaring (en geluidservaring). Hume daarentegen, doet een uitspraak over kleurervaring die veilig is zolang we zijn opmerkingen over het afleiden van kennis uit de werkelijkheid accepteren. Echter, we kunnen niet zomaar een vernieuwde definitie van kleurervaring pakken die ervan uitgaat dat we wel kennis kunnen afleiden uit de werkelijkheid, en deze in zijn theorie inpassen.

Hume’s scepticisme, dat als logisch gevolg heeft dat hij van kleuren niet erkent dat ze deels hun oorsprong in de werkelijkheid hebben, is een goed houdbare positie, maar incompatibel met de natuurkundige visie die zegt dat kleuren onze waarnemingen van weerkaatst licht zijn. Voor zover het de strikt argumentatieve houdbaarheid aangaat, kunnen we dus wellicht beter bij Hume aankloppen. Maar als we zoeken naar een theorie (uit die periode) die om weet te gaan met de natuurkundige/fysiologische ontwikkelingen van de volgende decennia (welke toch zeker niet mis zijn) blijkt Kant de beste keuze.


[1] Barry Maund, “Color,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2008 Edition), red. Edward N. Zalta, URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/color/&gt; (2 oktober 2011)

[2] Rob van Gerwen, Kennis in Schoonheid – Een inleiding in de moderne esthetica (Amsterdam: Boom Meppel, 1992), 67 – 68.

[3] Christian Helmut Wenzel, An Introduction to Kant’s Aesthetics – Core Concepts and Problems (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005), 60 – 61.

[4] Robert Boyle introduceerde de termen “primary qualities” en “secondary qualities.” In de filosofie wordt de terminologie vooral geassocieerd met John Locke.

[5] William Uzgalis, “John Locke”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition), red. Edward N. Zalta, URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2010/entries/locke/&gt; (1 oktober 2011).

[6] Wenzel, Kant’s Aesthetics, 63.

[7] Wenzel, Kant’s Aesthetics, 63 – 64.

[8] Leonhard Euler (1707 – 1783) was een Zwitsers wis- en natuurkundige.

[9] Immanuel Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment, 6e dr., vert. Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 109.

[10] R. W. G. Hunt & M. R. Pointer, Measuring Colour, 4e dr. (Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011). 1 – 15.

[11] Bruce MacEvoy, “Light and the eye,” URL = <http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/color1.html#constraints&gt; (2 oktober 2011).

[12] Hunt & Pointer, 1.

[13] Hunt & Pointer, 1.

[14] Van Gerwen, Kennis in Schoonheid, 44 – 45.

[15] David Hume, “An Enquiry concerning human understanding,” URL = < http://18th.eserver.org/hume-enquiry.html > (3 oktober 2011).

Bibliografie

Gerwen, van, Rob. Kennis in Schoonheid – Een inleiding in de moderne esthetica. Amsterdam: Boom Meppel, 1992.

Hume, David. “An enquiry concerning human understanding.” URL = <http://18th.eserver.org/hume-enquiry.html&gt; (geraadpleegd 3 oktober 2011).

Hume, David. “Of the standard of taste.”  URL = <http://academic.evergreen.edu/curricular/IBES/files/taste_hume.pdf&gt; (geraadpleegd 30 september 2011).

Hunt, R. W. G.  & Pointer, M. R. Measuring Colour, 4e dr. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. 1e dr. 1987.

Kant, Immanuel. Critique of the Power of Judgment, 6e dr. Vertaald door Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. 109. 1e dr. 2000.

Maund, Barry. “Color.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2008 Edition), red. Edward N. Zalta. URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/color/&gt; (geraadpleegd 2 oktober 2011)

Uzgalis, William. “John Locke.” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition), red. Edward N. Zalta. URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2010/entries/locke/&gt; (geraadpleegd 1 oktober 2011).

Wenzel, Christian Helmut. An Introduction to Kant’s Aesthetics – Core Concepts and Problems. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005.

Advertisements
1 comment
  1. I really like it whenever people come together and share opinions.
    Great blog, continue the good work!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: